Tag Archives: mr driller

WW #12 Panty Party

Due to the subject matter of our posts this Monday & Friday, some items may be NSFW. Barring some terrible graphics, we’re sorta aiming for PG-13 screenshots here, but, given everyone has a different threshold, anything potentially offensive will be behind the “Read More” links du jour. And this time, we’re hitting the ground running, so just a warning that we’re “too hot for Smash” already…

Ladies and gentlemen, this is Mai Shiranui

FGC #490 Dig Dug

DIG! DUG!What is the soul of a videogame?

Today’s game is Dig Dug. What’s more, ROB has chosen the Atari 2600 version of Dig Dug. This makes a certain amount of sense, as this is the only “pure” version of Dig Dug in my collection. Why? Well, Dig Dug is probably a game that takes up a whole six bits of space, so practically every version of Dig Dug since 1985 has not been available as a “single” game, but part of some larger collection. And more’s the pity! Living compilation to compilation might be good for some of the most established games, like Pac-Man or Galaga, but it doesn’t do ol’ Dig Dug any favors. You’re going to play Dig Dug for five minutes, say “oh, this is where all those inflation fetishists got their start,” and then move on to the next game. When you’re playing Dig Dug on a compilation where you can finally find an answer to what the hell Pac & Pal is about, you’re going to skip right past the fygars.

Which is, unfortunately, a loss for anyone that enjoys the more complicated games of the “simple” arcade era. Dig Dug has a lot going on! Everyone is familiar with how you can pump up your opponents to popping proportions, but you’re also allowed the strategic kills through falling rocks. The OG Mr. Driller is drilling his way through the dirt, so he may as well use some dirt to his advantage! And, as demonstrated for anyone that ever stuck around to watch Dig Dug’s attract mode, there is more to pumping your opponents than meets the eye. Most consider the multiple action-button presses of sending a pooka to hell to be some manner of “number of hits” issue, but there’s strategy in blowing up these underground monsters. Any partially inflated adversary is immobile, and, more importantly, not a threat to Taizo Hori, so you’re welcome to walk (well, dig) right through ‘em. What does this mean? Well, you can partially inflate your prey, and then sneak along the edges to avoid the attacks of other rivals. Or fill up a few baddies, make sure they’re all deflating in a vertical line, and call down a rock to Burger Time them all into something resembling a pancake. Dig Dug has more options than you’d think, particularly for a game that features a scant four directions and one whole button.

He definitely puts some silly clown to shame.

Get 'emBut we’re not just talking about Dig Dug today, we’re talking about Dig Dug for the Atari 2600. This is not the first Atari port that has been covered on Gogglebob.com. We’ve seen the Kangaroo go from the arcade to your living room, but that was a situation where no one remembered the arcade version anyway, so who cares? We’ve seen Pac-Man make his way to the Atari, too, and that was an unmitigated disaster. And there was Mario Bros, which was probably the best anyone could ever expect of a Nintendo arcade game adapted to the 2600. But was it perfect? Absolutely not. The physics were just wrong (Mario doesn’t have any of his signature momentum in his movements), and the fireballs went from an occasional nuisance to an omnipresent threat. If you wanted a “kinda” Mario Bros experience, the Atari version was a fun time, but it was still a far cry from the subtle joys of the arcade original.

But Dig Dug for Atari 2600? Miraculously, in every way, this feels like Dig Dug.

And it’s easy to see why: everything is here. There may be only two monsters in Dig Dug, but they both showed up. They both function in the exact same way, and they both pop in the same satisfying manner. Rocks are there. The tunnels are familiar. And all the secrets of Hanzo’s favorite offense are preserved. This is Dig Dug. It might not have the finer graphics of the arcade edition, but, for a game that had to survive on the Atari, it is very much Dig Dug. Even a primitive attempt at the dirt gradient is here, complete with the different colors that appear on later levels. That means they actually expected someone to get past the third stage! That’s dedication and optimism!

Damn dragonsBut why does it work? Is it just because it’s a simple copy of the original? Because it looks close enough to the arcade style to be legitimate? Or is it something less tangible? Is it simply because this version of Dig Dug has the right “feel”?

And, to answer that question, we should look at two of Dig Dug’s sequels: Dig Dug 2, and Dig Dug Arrangement. Dig Dug 2 was released three years after the original Dig Dug, and attempted to build on Dig Dug’s initial gameplay by introducing wholesale island demolition to Dig Dug’s repertoire. Rather than puttering around underground, Taizo Hori is sticking to the sunlight this time, but still moving in the same general 4-directional manner. And rather than wholly relying on his trusty pump, he can now detonate parts of the playfield to sink multiple monsters in one destructive go. Does it wind up being a fun game? Yep! Destroying everything in an effort to quash a villain invasion is always a good time. But does it feel like the successor to Dig Dug? Not particularly. It’s certainly a sequel to Dig Dug, but it doesn’t quite feel like Dig Dug.

Arrange thisDig Dug Arrangement was released in 1996 as part of Namco Classics Collection Volume 2, a multi-game arcade cabinet. Competing for quarters against the OG and arranged versions of Pac-Man and Rally-X, this title saw Taizo return to underground pumping, but with a bevy of new monsters, levels, and even bosses. There are three whole islands, and they involve environments stretching from mundane cities to the moon. And the collection of new opponents is vulnerable to the same old actions, but there are a variety of new tricks and traps that can be employed against this parade of pests. And is it fun? Still, again, it is. But is it Dig Dug? Yes! Everything that is included isn’t some oblique slide to mine-laying or whatever was happening in Dig Dug 2, but Dig Dug taken to a more interesting dimension. It’s still four directions and one action button, but it’s also a game where detonating a robot will demolish the rest of your opponents, and discovering interesting ways to use that new technique is practically a game unto itself. A more appropriate title for the game might be Dig Dug Plus, as it feels like Dig Dug plus a whole lot of fun.

And that’s the best way to describe what makes a good Dig Dug: how it “feels”. It’s incredibly subjective, it’s nearly impossible to define, It's dark outbut how a game “feels” is as close as we can get to knowing the soul of a videogame experience. It’s not about the graphics or the frame rate or whether or not a character has enough cleavage (let’s face facts: Taizo is not showing enough skin in Arrangement), it’s about whether the game feels right. That’s the essence of a good game and a good port. It’s why Pac-Man Atari fails, and why Dig Dug Atari succeeds.

If it feels right, it touches the soul of the game, and that’s what makes for a happy player.

FGC #490 Dig Dug

  • System: We’re looking at the Atari version, but Dig Dug has been on practically every system ever made thanks to various compilations. It somehow missed the SNES, though.
  • Number of players: Probably one of those two player alternating Atari games, but one player is probably the right way to look at it.
  • Pooka or Fygar: Fygar scared me as a child, as you just never knew when those jerks were gonna toss off some atomic firebreath. Pookas, meanwhile, wear goggles. So you should know which is my favorite monster.
  • Goggle Bob Fact: Dig Dug was one of the earliest games I ever played with “offensive options”, so I want to say Pooka was one of the first creatures, videogame or otherwise, that I ever instinctively murdered. The spree starts here!
  • OopsDid you know? Dig Dug Arranged has a two-player co-op mode, and both players share a score. That’s neat! It’s not competitive in any way! Everybody work together now.
  • Would I play again: Dig Dug is great arcade action. I might never try the Atari version again, but I’m sure I’ll hit the arcade version again on one of another six compilations.

What’s next? Random ROB has chosen… Devil May Cry 3! That game is featuring Dante from the Devil May Cry series! Please look forward to it!

FGC #103 Dig Dug: Digging Strike

DIG ITWhy not Dig Dug?

Dig Dug, aka Taizo Hori aka The Hero of the Dig Dug Incident, is… the… hero of Dig Dug. Damn, kind of wrote myself into a wall there. But that wouldn’t be a problem for Taizo (we’ll stick to his “real” name to distinguish the man from the game), whose drilling skills would take him straight through any wall, literary or otherwise. Taizo was the lone star of the original Dig Dug and Dig Dug 2, but he later burrowed himself into the Mr. Driller series as the father of the titular Mr. Driller, Susumu Hori. And since Dig Dug was released in 1982, Taizo is one of Namco’s oldest mascots.

And he gets no respect.

If it seems like I mention Smash Bros. in a lot of articles, it’s because I believe that series to be, essentially, the lavish awards show of Nintendo’s mascots. In the same way a movie critic may discuss last year’s best picture, I look at the main and supporting cast of Smash Bros. Fire Emblem is pretty popular this console cycle, let’s reward that series with seventeen new characters. Punch-Out!!! was a success… you’re in, Little Mac! Project Rainfall? Okay, let’s toss in a Shulk. Is it any coincidence that the principle “currency” in the Smash Bros. universe appears to be trophies? Being featured in Smash Bros., in almost any fashion, is an achievement on par with being at the top of your field… even if “you” are just a koopa spawn.

And, to be clear, I’m claiming Smash Bros. is for the best of the best of video game mascot characters, which is something completely different from just plain video games. There’s a fine line between “this franchise/character is really popular” and “this character only appears in good games”. Sorry, I just do not care for Wii Fit, as it called my mama fat (on Christmas!), and thus must be a bad game.

As we all know (because the game has been out for a while), Super Smash Bros. 4 opened the floodgates so a number of other video game companies could NO RESPECTooze on in. Along with Capcom and Sega, we also saw Namco get a slot on the roster, and include one of the most iconic characters in all of gaming history. Pac-Man, obviously, is a pretty big get, as he pretty much invented the concept of the video game mascot, and, well, you don’t see anybody fighting over Xevious watches. In a way, a battle between Cloud, Sonic, Pac-Man, and Mario is video games, and the mere fact that such a thing is possible is amazing for everyone involved.

But Pac-Man wasn’t the only piece of the Namco canon to make it into the Smash universe. Presumably thanks to their assistance in actually making the game, a number of Namco cameos appear all over the game. Pac-Man uses Mappy’s trampoline, Galaga ships are items, and a flag from Rally-X may grant a player an extra point. And in Smash Run, a mode that mostly involves exploring underground tunnels, we finally see a cameo from one of Namco’s oldest mascot games, Dig Dug. Here’s… pooka?

Dammit!

POPNow, honestly, I know it could be worse. Mappy, Namco character and the world’s seventh most popular cartoon rodent, has barely come out of his hole in the last three decades. Considering the average lifespan of a mouse is somewhere in the department of two years, a vermin walking that thin blue line is probably… retired by now. Dragon Buster’s Clovis, the inventor of the double jump, similarly has not seen the light of day in eons. And Dragon Spirit? May as well be a ghost. Taizo should be happy he got three games, a pile of rereleases, and a spin-off franchise. You don’t see anyone asking for the next game featuring Pac-Man’s son, after all.

I suppose I’m just bitter because I’ve always preferred Dig Dug’s gameplay over a number of other Namco arcade games. Pac-Man is a game where you’re always on the run, and, while you may temporarily gain the advantage over your pursuers, you know they’ll always come back, and it’s only a matter of time before the eater becomes the eaten. Galaga’s endless swarms of bugs is practically a chthonic nightmare, and Rally-X is another silly sports game. But Dig Dug? Taizo is a dedicated exterminator. He’s accomplishing something by clearing out pookas and fygars. Even if Taizo should fall (or have something fall on him), he has already reclaimed a number of areas, and his life (lives) shall not have been in vain. Or perhaps the most endearing thing is that when Taizo has defeated all but one enemy, the last remaining monster attempts to flee, creating the sensation that Taizo, digger extraordinaire, is not a mere hero, but an unstoppable, feared force of destruction. I am become Dig Dug.

And yes, Taizo (and those damn pookas) have cameoed in a number of Namco games over the years. I mean, he’s not completely forgotten, he’s just… well…

Putting down stakesTaizo’s third adventure was Dig Dug: Digging Strike. It’s an innovative combination of Dig Dug and (the often-forgotten but pretty great) Dig Dug 2. It’s also a pretty clever application of DS technology. You’re Taizo, and there are giant monsters stomping around the overworld while human-sized monsters hang out underground. Your job is to flip between the surface and underground to destroy monsters, yes, but also drive giant stakes into the ground that will then sink chunks of island, hopefully drowning the giant monsters beneath the waves. It’s fun all around, and various power-ups and new level hazards (here comes the lava!) escalate as Taizo progresses throughout the island chain that is housing all these creatures. It’s basically Dig Dug vs. Godzilla, and winds up being one of the few games where I feel like the hero has a legitimate reason (him smart) for being able to defeat skyscraper sized opponents (see also that game with those, whaddyacallem, Colossi).

But the whole experience seems tarnished by the fact that this is the last anybody saw of Taizo in a starring role. Yes, we’ll keep getting Dig Dug rereleases until the end of time, but Dig Dug: Digging Strike… well, it’s not the best thing on the DS, or even somewhere in the Top 10, but it’s still a very fun game. Dig Dug’s gameplay is fairly unique (hey, there’s no jump button in all three FGC games this week), and we literally haven’t seen any new spins on this formula in the last, let’s see here… eleven years! There are almost teenagers out there who have never known a new Dig Dug game! Won’t someone please think of the children?!

So, hey, Namco? I know you’re probably working on the next Tekken, Soul Calibur, or Ridge Racer, but maybe take a moment, get together a little team, and think about Taizo Hori. He’s been digging and dugging for decades now, and it’s time he got his due.

Or at least another damn game.

FGC #103 Dig Dug: Digging Strike

  • System: Nintendo DS. Would be just perfect for a 3DS or WiiU version, too! But nope.
  • Seriously?Number of players: One. No, wait, I think there’s multiplayer, but… yes, it appears you need to find another human being that owns this game, and I kinda forgot I had my copy, so the odds are low.
  • Drill Again: And we haven’t seen a new Mr. Driller game for a while, either. Are puzzle games just done in the face of cell phone games eating up that market? Can we just get some new Mr. Driller mobile games, then? Actually “new”, not just rereleases.
  • Pooka pooka: I want to say that the humble pooka is the first creature in a video game that I ever “killed”. I felt momentarily ashamed of popping the creature, but then a fygar toasted my Taizo, and I’ve been out for revenge ever since. Needless to say, I rather enjoy dragging Pit into the killing fields to exterminate them in Super Smash Bros.
  • Love at first sight: Jill Dozer and Taizo should hang out. Nah, that’s too may-december. Jill and Taizo should hang out, but then he introduces her to Susumu. There. Yes, let’s get the fanfic ball rolling.
  • Did you know? The star of Mr. Driller is Taizo’s son, so, of course, there has to be a mother driller floating around somewhere. In this case, Mr. Driller’s mom is Toby “Kissy” Masuyo, a galactic marine and the star of Baraduke. For reasons that are completely unclear, Taizo and Toby are divorced. Toby appears in the bonus ending of this game, jealous and annoyed at her former lover. All I want to do is meet the Namco staffer that decided that one its most iconic heroes should be bitter and divorced. Pac-Man, as of this writing, is still happily married.
  • Would I play again: I really like this game… but it’s also a DS game, which means it has to compete with not only the luminaries of the DS library, but also everything in the 3DS library, too. So, I’m a hypocrite, it’s unlikely I’ll ever see these specific Dig Dug adventures ever again.

What’s next? Random ROB has chosen… Prince of Persia for the Xbox 360! That would be the 2008 one that is completely divorced from The Sands of Time… and, apparently, destroyed the franchise. Oh boy. Please look forward to it!

What?

FGC #005 Yoshi Touch & Go

Good catchThe cycle of video game releases is… unnatural.

As anyone that “stays current” with video games knows, there is a tremendous push in the industry for the latest and, presumably, greatest. As I type this, Batman: The Latest Battening has just been released, and social media is alight with discussions regarding The Bat’s firepower and framerate. In approximately two weeks, no one will be talking about poor ol’ Bruce Wayne, and we will have moved on to… let’s just check the release schedule here… ah, yes, Onechanbara Z2: Chaos Banana Split Edition. That one sounds like a winner.

In contrast, while video game hardware is pushed just as hard as its software, anyone who buys a video game system within its first six months to a year is considered an “early adopter”, or, as the French put it, “un idiot”. In my memory, there have been exactly two systems with software released in their first year that would last the entirety of the system’s existence: Nintendo Gamecube, exclusively due to Smash Bros Melee, and the Sega Dreamcast, which wins pretty much by a sad kind of default. No matter how box-y future and past systems have been, there has always, always been a dramatic draught of worthwhile games for anyone who buys a system at launch. Best case scenario? Maybe you can hope for five decent games within a system’s first year, and in some N64ish cases, that’s the best you can hope for forever. Buying a system at launch is costly from a monetary and sanity perspective.

So, it’s really no surprise that I do that all the time. It’s the most specific case of senility doctors have ever seen.

The Nintendo DS was the first portable system I was ever able to purchase at launch (and the second portable system I was allowed to own, ever)(If you don’t count the Virtual Boy as portable [because why would you?]}. Suffice it to say, I was excited to play a simultaneously gimped and improved version of Mario 64, and then… well… nothing.

Grapes equal eggs, duhI survey my Nintendo DS collection, and see games that I would never have purchased if not for this seemingly endless drought. Feel the Magic XY/XX? Wow, no. Zookeeper? You may have been at the forefront of a genre, but you’re about as fun as actually cleaning up monkey poop. Mr. Driller Drill Spirits? Actually my first Mr. Driller game, but another one that is somehow gimped on the “new” system. And then we come to today’s choice: Yoshi Touch & Go.

Yoshi Touch & Go had so much potential. This may sound like heresy to some, but Super Mario World 2: Yoshi’s Island is decidedly not my favorite Mario Bros game. In fact, it’s pretty low on the list. This is not to say I don’t enjoy Yoshi’s Island, quite the opposite, it is a very fun game; however, it introduced those “collectathon” elements to 2-D Mario platformers that drive me completely insane. I have that peculiar kind of OCD that compels me to follow the rulings of ludicrous plastic robots, and causes me to collect every last red coin and smiling flower that I can find. And they very concept of stages locked behind 100% completion? Forget about it. My favorite thing to do in Mario games is hold down the B Button and run like hell to the goal post, and Yoshi’s Island stops that impulse cold. Finding secret exits was one thing, but since Yoshi’s Island, I’ve had to scavenge around for red coins, golden coins, and yoshi coins, and something important has been lost in the midst of finding every damn bauble and bead. I can’t help but blame Yoshi’s Island on this development.

But Yoshi Touch & Go had the potential to be the all killer, no filler Yoshi’s Island. After all, it’s the same adorable Yoshi and friends in the same gorgeous coloring book atmosphere, but now there’s no great treasure hunt afoot, just time to just hoof it to the goal and enjoy the simple running, jumping, and egg tossing.

Adoption is weirdIt was supposed to be a thing of beauty.

Instead, here we are, with a game that also started its own kind of horrible genre. Yoshi is running alright, he is, shall we say, endlessly running through nondescript “levels” that feature the same stupid obstacles over and over again in slightly modified configurations. Oh, and levels start with an odd vertical section featuring a falling Baby Mario and even less control available to the player. The pendulum has swung in the other direction, where once there was a game that I lamented because it gave me too much to do, here is a game that contains about five minutes worth of “gameplay”.

I’m not one to assign dollar values to games. To some, a single video game is a tremendous financial burden, to others, its equivalent to a vending machine super ball. Nevertheless, Yoshi Touch & Go is the epitome of the modern “dollar game”. This is a game meant to be played on a phone while waiting in line to get into the local discothèque. This is a game that is meant to be downloaded, not played on a cartridge, and retrieved when you’re waiting for your Xbone to perform its nineteenth system update this week. Yoshi Touch & Go isn’t a bad game, it was just released about a decade before its proper format, for both pricing and play, was invented. Also, it’s a bad game.

Good catch, KamekThere’s a term I love in gaming, and that’s “late to the party”. For those of you that have just beamed here from Alpha Centauri 6, the term refers to playing a video game well after the hype has died down and anyone who cared about the game in the first place has moved on to greener, more bananaful pastures. I propose the term “early to the party” for any of the early adopters out there, as I can think of no finer metaphor. Ever get to the party too early? There’s you. The party host is still getting ready. The temporary host is someone you’d never want to speak to, perhaps the host’s spouse (whom you barely know) or parents (oh God no). The only other guests? The smelly kid, because that kid is always where suck can be found, and the well meaning guest with food, who came early because there was food to bring, but that’s where this particular guest’s social skills end. Who would you like to hang out with? Which will leave the greatest funk upon your soul? And what does it mean that you’re here with them?

Next time a new system gets released, just wait. Stay home, wait until a good amount of time has passed, and then go ahead and join the party. Maybe while you’re waiting, play some Yoshi Touch & Go. Replay the horror.

FGC # 5 Yoshi Touch & Go

  • System: Nintendo DS
  • Number of Players: 1. Okay, technically its 2P, but good luck finding another sucker to play this with.
  • Why Was This Post Delayed: Mainly because it is way too easy to slide into becoming one of those blogs that is always angry at games and ranting against how could some video game designer do this to me and blah blah blah. That’s not for me, there’s too much negativity in this world as is. So, took the time to find an angle to this game that wasn’t just “Wow, this game sucks”.
  • But this game sucks, right? Oh my, yes.
  • What’s Your Highest Score? I am not going to admit how much I actually played this game.
  • Did You Know? IGN said this game, “is one of the most original and unique games created for the system so far…” I want to remind everyone this game was released four months after the release of the DS. There were maybe fifteen other DS games in existence.
  • Would I Play Again? Decidedly no. It’s currently available for the WiiU, where I can play Bit Trip Runner 2 if I really need to. And you better believe my 3DS cartridge slot has better things to do.

And we're done

What’s Next? Random ROB has chosen… Batman Arkham City. Hey, ROB, when did you get randomly relevant? Please look forward to it!