Tag Archives: Koji Igarashi

FGC #418 Bloodstained: Curse of the Moon

Blood!Bloodstained: Curse of the Moon is the rare game that is so good, it makes old games better.

Full disclosure: I have a complicated relationship with the early Castlevania titles. To elaborate, I am referring specifically to any Castlevania game that was released prior to Castlevania: Symphony of the Night (which I now realize that, thanks to the unstoppable march of time, is approximately twelve billion years old). But back before Alucard ever earned his first crissaegrim, there was the Belmont clan, and its unyielding pursuit of the death of the undead. And… I kinda didn’t like those Castlevania games? Maybe?

It’s complicated. Castlevania 2: Simon’s Quest was one of my first NES games (and, thus, one of my first videogames, period), and, as anyone that has ever banged their head against Deborah Cliff will tell you, it is a deeply confusing and difficult game. Luckily, I had an older neighbor (he was, like, twelve!) who shared tips and tricks on how to traverse the Wallachian countryside, and Castlevania 2 was less “impossible” and more “inordinately difficult”. I could send Dracula back to his grave! It… just took a password that unlocked all the items (and maybe I still died a thousand times). Oh, and I would totally glitch out that one jump in the graveyard area. What does it matter if Simon drowns? He’ll be better in no time.

Whip it good!But Castlevania 3? Now there was a game. It was another of my precious few “original” Nintendo games, and an air-mailed Christmas gift from my grandparents (who had fled to warmer climes for the holiday season). As a game I could immediately identify as both “advanced” (look at those amazing graphics!) and “clever” (four playable characters! That’s as many as a full gang of Ninja Turtles!), I was fairly convinced I enjoyed Castlevania 3. After all, I played Castlevania 3 so many times, I had all but mastered such advanced techniques as Grant’s wall hugging and Alucard’s surprisingly weak fireblasts. I was a Castlevania master!

And I think I only ever made it to level… four.

Yes, I could plug in “Help Me” and use that password everyone ripped out of Nintendo Power to skip straight to the good Count, but did I ever legitimately beat back Death with my NES Advantage? Never. Did I ever even approach the Doppelganger? Nope. And, as I can very vividly recall, that room with the falling blocks was the absolute end of many a playthrough. If Alucard ran out of hearts to bat his way up that chamber, I was just done. Don’t have time for this nonsense!

Which… was kind of the point. I continued to purchase and/or rent classic Castlevania titles (Bloodlines comes immediately to mind as my most rented Genesis title), and I unequivocally enjoyed that franchise… but it wasn’t Mega Man. It wasn’t Mario. In fact, Mario might have been the biggest reason I could never truly enjoy a Castlevania game. Even if I couldn’t put it into words at the time, I still had some thought in my head regarding that whole “joy of movement” theory. Mario was unmistakably fun to control. Simon Belmont? Not so much. His movements were restricted. He had a terrible jump, limited offensive options, and didn’t gain magical invincibility that killed every zombie in his path even once. And the average lifespan of a Belmont? Not very long when you consider how easily a single decapitated medusa could shove that entire clan into one of a thousand bottomless pits.

In short? It sucked to be a Belmont. And who wants to play a game where you have to suck?

Magic!Unfortunately, in the time since the Castlevania “classic” series reigned supreme, I have become a cranky old man. As such, I rarely have time nowadays for games that I do not immediately enjoy. Many JRPGs have fallen by the wayside simply because I cannot deal with another tutorial dungeon explaining how fire beats ice. Perfectly competent platformers have gone ignored because I bounced off the main character’s art style. And I’m not afraid to admit that I dropped at least one “game of the year” just because the hero’s initial movement speed was “too exhausting”. Suffice to say, I was not exactly expecting to dive into an “old school” Castlevania with the same gusto that a more grilled cheese-based Wee Goggle Bob was once capable of mustering.

But Bloodstained: Curse of the Moon was more than a little surprising.

First of all (he said, 700 or so words in), Bloodstained: CotM is just plain fun. It is aping Castlevania 3 like a monkey mimicking an orangutan, and it hews so closely to the “original”, it’s almost a surprise that Miriam can’t stick to walls. You start with the base, limited protagonist with slow, but functional, movements, move on to someone a little weaker, but with greater agility and range, pick up a squishy wizard with extremely convenient spells, and finally gain some brooding dork that craps fireballs and occasionally morphs into a bat. Unlike Castlevania 3, though, you do have the option of switching between all four combatants at once, which wildly increases the odds you’ll ever bother with that weakling mage. And that also means stages are designed around every possible party combination, and… that’s where things get complicated.

Stairs!It is very likely that, upon playing B:CoTM for the first time, the player will choose to recruit every last ally, and utilize their skills in every possible combination across all levels. Once that task is completed, a new mode will unlock wherein all the extra allies are available from the start, but Zangetsu (the ersatz Belmont and initial playable character) is missing in action. And he’s not missed! It’s pretty clear that Zangetsu is the Zeppo of these Marx brothers, and you’re much better off using literally anyone else. Miriam has mad ups, Alfred can blast any boss, and Gebel can scratch those hard to reach places. Who even invited that Zangetsu nerd in the first place?

This, naturally, will lead a curious player toward trying that initial mode again, but this time, using only Zangetsu. He’s the worst, but that just makes him a “secret” kind of hard mode, right? Not quite…

Zangetsu has two options for a solo outing. On one route, he may choose the bloody path of literally murdering each of his potential allies. And the prize for his sins will be access to new offensive and gymnastic skills. A homicidal Zangetsu can acquire a sweeping slash, high-speed dash, double jump, and a “charge attack” that would put a certain Mega Buster to shame. And then he’s the best character in the game! Without a question! Who even needs friends when you can slash an enormous turtle monster in half! I am become Death!

But then there’s “true” solo mode. Friendly Zangetsu acknowledges that all these wizards crawling around are creeping him out, but doesn’t kill a single one of them. Zangetsu must soldier on with his meager skills, and thus the player must learn to deal with a lame jump and Link’s Adventure-level weapon range. Zangetsu is pathetic, and every challenge becomes actually challenging, even for someone that has already saved this world three times or so.

But you know what? It’s doable.

Not a vampire!Bloodstained: CoTM is built for a full party of moon murderers (I miss just saying “vampire slayers”), including at least one dude that can magically become invincible, and another than can fly literally anywhere. Its stages are also designed for just the guy who can barely jump. In fact, the game is designed equally for both eventualities, and offers a wildly different experience for either choice. And, crucially, this means that the choices the player makes over the course of the adventure are significant. You don’t need a “Miriam will remember that” prompt to tell you something significant has happened when you’re too busy fighting your way over a bottomless pit to notice, and the “penalty” for literally killing a possible helper is immediately revealed in a sudden change of moveset. But, by the same token, these important choices may create a game that is more or less difficult, but never a game that becomes a complete cakewalk or impossibility. Everything here was carefully designed around players playing the game their way, and that allows for an inordinate amount of fun.

And, yeah, that’s something Bloodstained: CoTM learned from Castlevania 3, too. Heck, you could even claim it learned it from the original Castlevania. After all, tell me you’re not playing two different games depending on whether you decide to bring a bottle of holy water to a Frankenstein fight. The “old school” Castlevania titles might not have been as much fun to play as Mega Man, but in their limitations, they created an environment where the player had more choices than any title that involved a tanooki leaf.

Bloodstained: Curse of the Moon taught me that the original Castlevania titles were always more than they seemed, and didn’t need to pull in a single vampire to do it. Mimic a franchise, and somehow make the base franchise better? Pretty good trick, Bloodstained.

FGC #418 Bloodstained: Curse of the Moon

  • System: PC, Nintendo Switch, 3DS, Sony Playstation 4, and Vita. Sorry, this will be the only Bloodstained merchandise appearing on the Vita.
  • Number of players: One is good enough.
  • Pimpin!Favorite Boss: Hey, it turns out all these jerks have names on the official website! Valefor, the giant monster wearing a pimp hat, is my clear winner. He’s made of gold! And tries to kill you with gold! And can occasionally summon monsters made of gold! That’s solid gold, baby!
  • Out of Order: Did anyone else find Bathin, the light speed lizard that haunts the mechanical library, to be easier than literally every previous boss in the game? Its super fast attacks would be impossible without those target reticules, but with giant flashing “don’t stand here” signs all over the place? Not so much.
  • Favorite Character: Good call on making Miriam, the star of the upcoming Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night, arguably the most useful character. Sure, she is lacking in health or very strong attacks, but agility goes a long way in the 2-D world.
  • Favorite Reason 16-Bit Graphics were invented: Nothing interesting about the main characters really comes across with these faux 8-bit sprites, but Gebel really loses something when lo-fi. He’s supposed to be adorned with blood-purple stained glass across his flesh, but here? Here he’s just Alucard.
  • Would I play again? Odds are really good! Maybe I’ll even give that boss-rush a chance! Or maybe I’ll actually keep playing the parts of the game I enjoy! Who knows what the future holds?

What’s next? Random ROB has chosen… Super Alfred Chicken for the Super Nintendo! There we go! There’s that randomness we all love and crave! Please look forward to it!

Choo Choo!

FGC #224 Castlevania Aria of Sorrow

Favorite clocktowerIs Castlevania: Aria of Sorrow the pinnacle of the Igavania legacy?

Koji Igarashi is widely credited with being responsible for the perennial Castlevania: Symphony of the Night. Where once the Castlevania franchise had been “only” a series of difficult action platforming affairs, Castlevania: SOTN broke the mold and ushered the franchise into a world of maps, secret passages, and more random food items than you could shake a dagger at. Granted, practically everything in Symphony of the Night was already a part of previous Castlevania games (particularly the skeleton sprites), but the IGA-helmed SoTN blended all of these elements into a much more Metroid-y, exploration based affair. It wound up being new, innovative, and, most importantly of all, fun. And, aside from a shocking lack of a boss rush, SoTN was considered to be perfect.

But… how do you improve on perfection?

Castlevania SoTN was followed by Castlevania Legends, and, later, Castlevania: Circle of the Moon. Neither of these games involved Koji Igarashi, but both tried different techniques to bottle the SoTN lightning. Castlevania: Circle of the Moon attempted to ape the Metroidvania gameplay with scattered success, and Castlevania Legends decided to just include SoTN star Alucard to hopefully polish up that turd to a level where it didn’t immediately stink up the joint. It didn’t take. But Circle of the Moon at least made the Igavania a standard piece of the Castlevania puzzle, and didn’t trash the “experiment” like the second adventure of a certain Hyrulian elf.

And then there was Castlevania: Harmony of Dissonance. C:HoD was the first IGA returned to the Castlevania franchise after SoTN, and… well… let’s say he was getting his skeleton legs back. A lot of HoD seems like it was in response to Circle of the Moon, and, right down to the basic “rivals” plot, much of this game feels like “this is how I would have done it.” That’s not necessarily a bad thing, as I’m at least one person that prefers HoD to CotM, but the whole experience still feels rather… shallow. The “chaos castle” is generally bland and a poor excuse to recycle almost the entire map, and, despite some downright charming references to Slide along homeearlier entries in the series, HoD generally feels like a “lesser” Castlevania. Yes, this is what happens when you attempt to convert a Playstation game to a handheld format. Thanks for playing, pray for peace in Wallachia.

And then came Castlevania: Aria of Sorrow. Now here’s a proper Igavania.

Except… let’s not talk about that yet.

Let’s talk about what came after Castlevania: Aria of Sorrow. Castlevania: Portrait of Ruin is an Igavania… but it seems much more “level based” with its multiple portrait stages and a castle that is almost perfunctory. Castlevania: Order of Ecclesia took this even further, and the majority of the game is comprised of “levels” that would feel right at home in earlier adventures. Hell, the “castle” of OoE is practically a “bonus” afterthought. And then there’s even Castlevania Aria of Sorrow’s immediate sequel, the bafflingly named Castlevania: Dawn of Sorrow, which superficially follows the Metroid path of its forefathers… but closer examination reveals a number of “level-y” areas, complete with a final series of challenges that barely amount to more than dangerous hallways (or maybe towers).

In short, it seems IGA shifted away from the metroidvania template after Aria of Sorrow. The basic elements were still there, but they generally tapered off until we got “all challenge levels” Castlevania: Harmony of Despair, and no one was surprised.

So why was Aria of Sorrow the end? Well, maybe it’s because it really is the pinnacle of IGA’s intention.

PEW PEWAt first blush, Aria of Sorrow doesn’t do anything Symphony of the Night didn’t. You’re a normal quasi-vampire with a sword or two, and you’ve got to explore a castle. Expand your skills as you defeat bosses, eventually gain the ability to turn into a bat, and maybe you’ll see the “secret” ending for finding the right nooks and crannies in this kooky castle. I’m sure there’s some wall meat around here if you get hungry for more.

But Aria does have more than Symphony. Aria introduced the Tactical Souls System, seemingly the apogee of the “Alucard can equip every damn thing in the castle” system of Symphony. Soma, our hapless hero, can absorb the souls of literally every monster in the castle, and each soul offers a new and interesting ability. Okay, most of the abilities are stupid (do you really need a monster soul to augment your spitting ability?), but there’s always that joy of discovery to be had, and maybe that witch that can’t seem to fly is going to offer a useful ability (answer: yes, she gives you the power of cats!). And, since AoS takes place in the far flung future of two decades from now, all sorts of items are available to Soma, like handguns, RPGs, and even a laser gun. Okay, sure, a legion of lost souls has always had the ability to generate laser blasts, but it’s so much more satisfying when you let loose with a gun that is wider than the protagonist. Couple this with every food item through the whole of human history sitting around Soma’s inventory at any given moment, well, to say the least, Soma has got some options. You could easily play this game a hundred times, and never use the same soul/item combination twice.

And maybe that’s all Koji Igarashi ever wanted.

SpookyIt’s been said before, but, as fun as the Igavania games are, they’re kind of lacking in some design sense. Many areas of many of these games are basic monster gauntlets, and, even going back to SoTN, you can likely point to any random point on the map, and quickly discover a flat hallway that is “only” a series of indistinct monsters. And, while part of the appeal of these Igavanias is that we’ve left the plodding Belmonts in the dust, even at top speed, you’re likely to cut through these dreary hallways again and again. One could easily argue that a “good” Metroidvania should be more… interesting. Look at Super Metroid, look at all the creativity that goes into any given room on that planet… or just consider how a speed booster equipped Samus Aran would absolutely destroy 90% of Alucard’s greatest adventure.

But maybe that was never the point.

Maybe the point has always been all the wild “crap” that could be squeezed into any given corner. Maybe it’s not about appealing room layouts, but the interesting inhabits of those rooms, whether they be psycho maids or waiter skeletons. Maybe it’s about going through that same stupid hallway over and over again, but every time you return, you’ve got a new ability to try out. No, the latest iteration of the fireball or the ability to hover mid jumpkick isn’t going to make the traversal any faster or easier, but it could make things a tweak more exciting. Maybe it’s not about seeing the same stupid skeleton continually, but seeing just how many ways you can mangle those bags o’ bones. Maybe it was never about 100% completion, or uncovering every last bit of the map, or finding the fastest route to (not) Dracula. Maybe it was about something else all this time.

A-hoy!And maybe, having crammed so much into Aria of Sorrow, Koji Igarashi felt content, and decided to move onto other challenges. Going forward, maybe he wanted to join the best of the old with the wonder of his new, and the later Igavanias were born. Maybe Aria of Sorrow was the top, and from there, only dissimilar challenges remained.

Or maybe I’m just happy we finally got a decent boss rush. Hey, whatever makes a game good.

FGC #224 Castlevania Aria of Sorrow

  • System: Gameboy Advance and WiiU Virtual Console. Has anyone picked up any GBA games on the WiiU? Is the emulation any good? I’m still using my Gamecube player over here.
  • Number of players: One Soma. Maybe a Julius, but still just one.
  • Favorite Soul: Waiter Skeleton allows Soma to toss curry at monsters. I like curry. I also like that all monsters seem to target the curry, so you can actually use the curry to effectively manage some of the more crowded challenge rooms. YUMMYGo get yer dinner, Balore!
  • Favorite Boss: In this case, it has to be Julius Belmont. Unlike battles with Richter in SoTN or… Richter again in Portrait of Ruin, this Belmont battle feels right, less like an easter egg and more like the typical Dracula battle… except maybe from the wrong side. Just watch out for that cross special.
  • Favorite Weapon: Excalibur, the legendary sword in the stone… is still in its stone. Cute.
  • Did you know? The plot of this game is based on an actual Nostradamus prophecy regarding a great evil coming to power in 1999. Dude was off by eighteen years, but, still, pretty good for a guy from World Heroes.
  • Would I play again: I love this game. And every time I play it, I have to play…

What’s next? Random ROB is taking a backseat so I can play… Castlevania Dawn of Sorrow for Nintendo DS! What? I have to play the sequel after the original. It’s only proper. Please look forward to it!

Erm